Scott Storm

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"Dinner Time" by Scot Storm. Scot Storm's interest in wildlife art became such a passion that in 1999, he decided to give up his career in architecture and devote himself full time to painting. Scot was then able to challenge himself in every aspect of his creations from composition, to lighting, to the accuracy and psychology of color. His paintings of waterfowl, hunting dogs and other animals all reveal his attention to the fine details that breathe life into every image and draw the viewer into a scene.
Scot Storm. As a youngster, Scot Storm discovered his talent for drawing, sketching and design. These skills eventually led him to North Dakota State University where he earned a degree in architecture. While working in this field, Scot’s love of hunting and the outdoors drew him to explore the challenges of wildlife art. In 1987, as a self-taught artist, he entered the Minnesota Duck Stamp contest and placed second. Encouraged by the acceptance of his initial work, he continued to enter stamp contests and enjoyed his first top award by winning the Indiana Pheasant Stamp competition in 1991.

Scott Storm

As a youngster, Scot Storm discovered his talent for drawing, sketching and design. These skills eventually led him to North Dakota State University where he earned a degree in architecture. While working in this field, Scot’s love of hunting and the outdoors drew him to explore the challenges of wildlife art. In 1987, as a self-taught artist, he entered the Minnesota Duck Stamp contest and placed second. Encouraged by the acceptance of his initial work, he continued to enter stamp contests and enjoyed his first top award by winning the Indiana Pheasant Stamp competition in 1991.

Thereafter, Scot’s interest in wildlife art became such a passion that in 1999, he decided to give up his career in architecture and devote himself full time to painting. Scot was then able to challenge himself in every aspect of his creations from composition, to lighting, to the accuracy and psychology of color. His paintings of waterfowl, hunting dogs and other animals all reveal his attention to the fine details that breathe life into every image and draw the viewer into a scene.

Currently Scot has 16 Federal, State and Conservation Stamp wins. Highlights of his career include the 2004-05 Federal Duck Stamp, 2005-06 & 2-014-15 Ducks Unlimited International Artist of the Year and 2010 & 2014 Pheasant’s Forever’s National Artist of the Year.

Scot currently lives in Freeport, MN, with his wife and family. Besides spending many hours painting in the studio and traveling the country in pursuit of new reference material for future works, he spends time coaching wrestling and youth football and enjoys spending hours in the field with family and friends.

Minnesota Artist Scot Storm and the $40 Million Duck Stamp

By Vanessa Kauffman and Larry Dean

It’s as easy as 1…2…3. Or so it might seem for Midwest artists who claimed all of the top three honors at the 2018 Federal Duck Stamp Contest in Las Vegas, Nevada, Sept. 14-15.

Not many artists in history can claim to have rendered a $40 million painting. But Freeport, Minnesota’s Scot Storm’s will most assuredly one day be able to count himself as one. That’s because his acrylic painting of a wood duck and decoy won the 2018 Federal Duck Stamp Art Contest.

Storm’s painting will be made into the 2019-2020 Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, or “Duck Stamp”, which will go on sale in late June 2019. The Service produces the Federal Duck Stamp, which sells for $25 and raises up to $40 million in sales each year. These funds support critical conservation to protect wetland habitats in the National Wildlife Refuge System for the benefit of wildlife and the enjoyment of people.

“Waterfowl hunters are some of our nation’s most passionate wildlife conservationists,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. “More than 80 years after it was established, sales of the Duck Stamp to hunters, bird watchers, outdoor enthusiasts and collectors have raised more than $1 billion to conserve nearly six million acres of habitat for birds and other wildlife and provide countless opportunities for hunting and recreation on our public lands.”

To recognize the contributions of waterfowl hunters, who have been instrumental in conserving our nation’s wildlife, all entries in this year’s contest were required to include depictions of one or more hunting-themed elements. Storm’s artwork featured a wood duck decoy.

“I look forward to seeing this beautiful artwork adorning the 86th Federal Duck Stamp,” said Andrea Travnicek, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks, who unveiled the winning painting at this year’s contest. “The stamp created using Scot’s art will serve as a lasting reminder of our rich waterfowl hunting heritage.”

This is Storm’s second Federal Duck Stamp Contest win. His art previously appeared on the 2004-2005 Federal Duck Stamp.

Frank Mittlestadt of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, placed second with his acrylic painting of wood duck with a hunting scene in the background. Greg Alexander of Ashland, Wisconsin, took third place with his acrylic painting of lesser scaup.

Second place entry by Frank Mittlestadt of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. Photo by USFWS.

Second place entry by Frank Mittlestadt of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. Photo by USFWS. Of 153 entries in this year’s competition, held at Springs Preserve in Las Vegas, Nevada, 19 entries made it to the final round of judging. Eligible species for this year’s Federal Duck Stamp Contest were the wood duck, American wigeon, northern pintail, green-winged teal and lesser scaup. View the online gallery of the 2018 Federal Duck Stamp Art Contest entries.

The judges for this year’s Federal Duck Stamp Contest were: Lowell Baier, an attorney and environmental policy adviser; Bob Blohm, a retired administrator with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory Bird Program; Roberta Laine, an art educator; Chris Maynard, an artist and avid hunter; and Brett James Smith, a wildlife artist who works in multiple media.

“A huge thank-you goes to the staff here at Springs Preserve for hosting the contest this year,” Service Deputy Director Jim Kurth said. “With its hiking trails and beautiful gardens, Springs Preserve is a great example of how you don’t need to go far from the city center to explore the great outdoors.”

Waterfowl hunters age 16 and older are required to purchase and carry the current Federal Duck Stamp. Many non-hunters, including birdwatchers, conservationists, stamp collectors and others also purchase the stamp in support of habitat conservation. Additionally, a current Federal Duck Stamp can be used for free admission to any national wildlife refuge that charges an entry fee.

Funds raised from the sale of Federal Duck Stamps goes toward the acquisition or lease of habitat for the National Wildlife Refuge System. This year, the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission, chaired by Secretary Zinke, awarded $22.9 million from the fund, made up partly of Duck Stamp dollars, to support the acquisition of refuge lands from willing sellers. The new areas provide additional access to the public to some of the most spectacular places available for hunting, fishing, birdwatching, hiking and other outdoor activities.

Reference

Pickens Museum

Osage Warrior in the Enemy Camp by Sculptor John Free. Seeking to attain his tribe's highest war honor by touching his enemy. This action among indigenous peoples is called "Counting Coup".
Osage Warrior in the Enemy Camp by Sculptor John Free. “Osage Warrior in the Enemy Camp” is a bronze created by Osage Artist John Free. The bronze, eight feet high and twelve feet long) was enlarged to 1-1/4 life size through the efforts of John Free of the Bronze Horse foundry in Pawhuska and Hugh Pickens. Pictured (L-R): Hugh Pickens, Executive Director of Pickens Museum and Principal Chief Geoffrey Standing Bear of the Osage Nation.
Three Faces of the Pioneer Woman by Artist Daniel Pickens. “Three Faces of the Pioneer Woman” is a mural painted by fine artist Daniel Pickens. Daniel was born in Lima, Peru in 1974 and is currently living in Stockholm, Sweden. This mural is at our Ponca City location.
Three Faces of the Pioneer Woman by Artist Daniel Pickens. Our mural "The Three Faces of the Pioneer Woman" is located in City Central at our Ponca City location.
Doctor Pickens Museum of Turquoise Jewelry and Art. Pickens Museum displays art works at NOC Tonkawa campus. Pictured (L-R): Dr. Cheryl Evans, NOC President, Hugh Pickens, Executive Director of Pickens Museum, and Sheri Snyder, NOC Vice President for Development and Community Relations. (photo by John Pickard/Northern Oklahoma College) This art is at our Tonkawa location
Native American Artist Yatika Starr Fields Completes Mural for Pickens Museum.
The World's Largest Naja. Future location of Pickens Museum on Route 60 and "U" Street West of Ponca City
Architectural Renderings of Pickens Museum.
Display of Turquoise Jewelry.
"Red Man" by Native American Artist Fritz Scholder. Pickens Museum Director Hugh Pickens on right.
Native American Jewelry Artist Tonya Rafael with a silver frame she created to honor my wife Sr. S.J. Pickens. My wife and Tonya worked together over the years creating new jewelry art pieces. My wife had an eye for color and would often design a spectacular piece and ask Tonya to execute it for her. A skilled silversmith, Tonya would sometimes stay in our guest house, set up a workshop, and work for days at a time on a Squash Blossom, Bolo, or Bracelet my wife commissioned. The piece is a silver picture frame that Tonya cut out of thick silver plate. Around the edge of the picture frame are 95 small turquoise stones. In the top is a large spiny oyster stone in the shape of a heart. The frame contains a photo that Tonya took of my wife a few years ago. Dr. Pickens is wearing one of her favorite outfits and if you look closely you can see a special squash blossom and necklace that Tonya created for my wife. In the bottom of the frame is an inscription.
Native American Artist Jolene Bird. Jolene Bird is an accomplished artist who learned her craft from her grandfather over 20 years ago. Jolene makes her jewelry in the tradition of the Santo Domingo Pueblo in New Mexico. This is a Fender Stratocaster guitar onto which Jolene has attached pieces of Kingman and Sonoran Turquoise highlighted with Jet. The stars are in Abalone, Mother of Pearl, Pipestone, Yellow Serpentine, and Spiny Oyster. The artistry in this piece is simply breathtaking and has to be seen to be believed. Consider that this is a three dimensional mosaic, a three dimensional jigsaw puzzle if you will. Jolene told me that each individual piece of turquoise had to be cut, shaped, and ground down to fit perfectly with the other pieces. Each individual piece probably took six to eight hours to produce and there are literally hundreds of pieces covering the guitar.
Painting by Peruvian Artist Josue Sanchez. Photo Credit: Hugh Pickens Pickens Museum

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